King mì.

Global Journey: Scene II

I'll unabashedly pronounce most bánh mì's in Hồ Chí Minh are a let down. I'm always on the lookout for new spots, and sample willingly- but there are next to none that wow me. To be honest sometimes I crave a bánh mì from my joint back in Southern Cali. Probably the only thing I miss from the Valley.


Since the fillings are generally of similar taste and quality- there are two things that set a great bánh mì apart from a standard one: 1) The special fatty sauce 2) The loaves. You can't have a good Bánh Mì with a mediocre roll. Most of the time the rolls in Sài Gòn are soft and pretty much wilted from the tropical fury that is Southeast Asia. A hot roll fresh outta the oven can never be too bad, but I'm looking for a crispy crust and pillowy center. I'm looking for Bánh Ecstasì. Took me two years...but I got it.


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Let me introduce you to the bánh mì that has the power to changes lives, rekindle once-failed romances, lay weapons down to rest and put an end to Siberian tiger poaching. Do you believe?


Bnh M Cam Ranh
Say what's up to Hạnh and Hà. They've been peddling sandos from this stand for 13 years. They go through about 600 {!!!} loaves a day, and the 3¢ of profit (500-700 Đ) they take in from each sale is enough to put their kids through school and fill all the bellies with rice. See up there next to the scale? Yea, that's a tellie. This is a bánh mì stand that does call-in orders. Poppin.


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Business Card.


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The fillings are super fresh, equally proportioned and of course, tasty. I get a xíu mại (pork meatball) & chả lụa combo. The bread is warm and crisp after a quick toast in their charcoal oven. A special pork-fat sauce [lower right] is ladled in each loaf that just straight takes it over the top.


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My loaf, brimming with chà bông (dried pork 'floss') and shredded scallions. Unreal. Yet real. Get yours.




Stay Legendary.

3 comments:

S. Reid said...

They're so good! I finally had one the other day (for 10.000 VND) on the corner of Cong Quynh and Ngyuen Trai.

Mel said...

Looks awesome. I'm bummed to hear the banh mi in Saigon is not so great nowadays. They don't use french bread anymore? Mind you, I haven't been to Saigon since 1994, but they were rockin' then. I've had some great banh mi in Phnom Penh too (as well as some truly awful ones).

Ana Powell said...

Hi Anthony
Nice to be acquainted.
I have been browsing through your Blog and I felt in love with your work. Great stuff.
You must forgive me but I am a complete novice regarding Vietnamese food, my first attempt was the Bánh Mí baguette.
I have a great admiration for Vietnamese cuisine, love the freshness of the ingredients the herbs used, so flavoursome and delicious.
I`ll come back to see how you`re doing.
Thanks for your visit ♥

~LinkWithin

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